Modi-De-hyphenated-foreign-policy-iastoppers
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De-hyphenated India’s Foreign Policy [Mains Article]

In the changing geopolitical scenario, the complexities and interactions have increased. Watertight compartmentalisation isn't possible in such situations. National interest should be considered while resorting to hyphenation or dehyphenation on case to case basis.
By IT's Mains Articles Team
October 26, 2017

Contents

  • What is De-hyphenated foreign policy?
  • Features of the De-hyphenated foreign policy
  • De-hyphenated India’s foreign policy
  • Benefits of de-hyphenated foreign policy
  • Conclusions

De-hyphenated India’s Foreign Policy [Mains Article]

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GS (M) Paper-2: “Effect of policies and politics of developed and developing countries on India’s interests, Indian diaspora.”

 

What is De-hyphenated foreign policy?

  • The policy where one country builds up relations with another country on standalone basis and without any linking (fear of backlash or criticism) with any other country is called de-hyphenation policy.

Features of the De-hyphenated foreign policy

The De hyphenated foreign policy means the foreign policy with

  • More pragmatism and more need based approach than the traditional ethos.
  • Rational Public discourse on various foreign policy aspects.
  • Active role of elected representatives in foreign policy.
  • Efficient use of track 2 and track 3 diplomacy to meet the requirements of dialogues and foreign relations
  • Use of economic strengths in relations to deal with the geo political goals
  • Using soft power in foreign relations

De-hyphenated India’s foreign policy

Modi-Israel-De-hyphenated-foreign-policy-iastoppers

  • India’s Non-alignment is the biggest example of de-hyphenated foreign policy where India made relations with both the adversaries of Cold war; US and Russia simultaneously without linking each other.
  • Post World War II, world was divided between two power centres, US and the Soviet Union. A few nations, decided not to be a part of any power centres and remain non-aligned. As a result, Non-Align Movement (NAM) came into existence.
  • India, one of the early members of NAM, hesitated to establish full-fledged relations with Israel. Some strategy makers in New Delhi were of the opinion that this might offend Islamic nations.
  • As, India remained non-aligned, any state visit by an Indian leader was hyphenated as Israel- Palestine visit. This means the visiting Indian leader used to visit both Israel and Palestine, in-order not to show any favouritism towards any of the two nations.
  • In an unprecedented move, India’s PM Modi visited Israel and not Palestine. This divestment from NAM and projecting an explicit foreign policy stand is a perfect example of de-hyphenation in diplomacy.
  • It doesn’t mean there is any shift in our West Asia policy. India is wedded to support for the just cause of the Palestinian people and their government. It has supported Palestine in resolutions sponsored by them or other countries at the UN on many occasions.

Benefits of de-hyphenated foreign policy

There are no permanent friends or permanent enemies in international relations but by following hyphenated foreign policy, our national interests were restricted. It would not be correct to discard the tool of hyphenation just because today de-hyphenation is more relevant.

  • India’s decision making matters in terms of foreign policy becomes autonomous.
  • India’s foreign policy is solely guided by national interest; delinking other priorities.
  • India has been able to develop close ties with Israel without irking Palestine or other Islamic countries.
  • India’s is major oil and trading partners of both Saudi Arabia and Iran; despite of both being arch rivals in the region
  • India has diplomatic ties with relations with China and Taiwan; without harming her national interests.
  • India’s can now purchase latest weaponry from US and western allies without damaging her ties with Russia.
  • This policy has led to diversification of markets and supplies.

De-hyphenated-foreign-policy-iastoppers

Conclusions

  • Current government is moving towards dynamic de-hyphenated policy.
  • In our pragmatic de-hyphenated foreign policy, we are friends with Iran and Saudi Arabia at the same time; US and Russia at the same time. China, Philippines, Japan, Vietnam — all of them may be friends or foes at various levels; but for us they are all our friends on a stand-alone basis.
  • In the changing geopolitical scenario, the complexities and interactions have increased. Watertight compartmentalisation isn’t possible in such situations.
  • National interest should be considered while resorting to hyphenation or dehyphenation on case to case basis.
[Ref: The Hindu, Indian Express]

 

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