Flash-Card-for-IAS-Prelims-2019-polity-Day-31
70 Days WAR Plan

Day#31 Static Flash Cards Polity & Governance [70 Days WAR Plan]

Writ of Mandamus; Article 14; Judicial Review; Independence of Court; Appointments to the District Courts; Section 20A of the Representation of the People Act; Chief Justice of High Court; Appellate Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court; Good Governance Day;
By IT's Core Team
April 21, 2019

 

 

 

Good Governance Day is a working day of national importance in India observed annually on which date?

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Answer:

  • Good Governance Day is a working day of national importance in India observed annually on the 25th of December, the birth anniversary of former-Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee.

Enrich Your Learning:

  • Good Governance Day was established in 2014 to honour Prime Minister Vajpayee by fostering awareness among the Indian people of accountability in government.
  • In keeping with this principle, the Government of India has decreed Good Governance Day to be a working day for the government.

Objectives of Good Governance Day:

  • To make people aware about the government commitment for providing a transparent and accountable administration in the country.
  • To enhance the welfare and betterment of the people.
  • To standardise the government functioning and to make it a highly effective and accountable governance for the citizens of the country.
  • To implement the good and effective policies to complete a mission of good governance in India.
  • To enhance the growth and development in the country through good governance.
  • To bring citizens closer to the government to make them active participants in the good governance process.

 

 

 

Which matters fall under the Appellate Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court?

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Answer & Enrich Your Learning:

Appellate Jurisdiction:

  • The Supreme Court is the highest court of appeal from all courts in the territory of India.
  • It has comprehensive appellant jurisdiction in cases involving constitutional issues; civil and criminal cases involving specified threshold values of property or a death sentence; and wide ranging powers of special appeals.
  • Article 132 of the Constitution provides for an appeal to the Supreme Court from any judgement or final order of a court in civil, criminal or other proceedings of a High Court, if it involves a substantial question of law as to the interpretation of the Constitution.
  • The appeal again depends upon whether the High Court certifies, and if does not, the Supreme Court may grant special leave to appeal.
  • Article 133 of the Constitution provides that an appeal in civil cases lies to the Supreme Court from any judgement, order or civil proceedings of a High Court.
  • This appeal may be made if the case involves a substantial question of law of general importance or if in the opinion of the High Court the said question needs to be decided by the Supreme Court.
  • Article 134 provides the Supreme Court with appellate jurisdiction in criminal matters from any judgement, final order, or sentence of a High Court.

This jurisdiction can be invoked only in three different categories of cases:

  • If the High Court on appeal reverses an order of acquittal of an accused person and sentenced to death.
  • If the High Court has withdrawn for trail before itself any case from any court subordinate to its authority and has in such a trial convicted the accused person and sentenced him to death, and
  • If the High Court certifies that the case is fit for appeal to the Supreme Court. Finally, the Supreme Court has the special appellate jurisdiction. It has the power to grant, in its discretion, special leave appeal from any judgment, decree sentence or order in any case or matter passed or made by any court or tribunal.

 

 

 

The Chief Justice of High Court can be removed by President only after an impeachment process by Lok Sabha. Right OR Wrong?

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Answer:

Right Statement:

  • A Chief Justice or Judge of the Supreme Court or of any High Court can be removed from his/her office by the President only after an impeachment process by both the Houses of Parliament.

Enrich Your Learning:

President and High Court Judges:

  • President has power to appoint judges of High Courts.
  • President has the power to remove judges of High Courts.
  • President can reduce the salaries of judges of High Courts during finance emergency.
  • A Chief Justice or Judge of the Supreme Court or of any High Court can be removed from his/her office by the President only after an impeachment process by both the Houses of Parliament.
  • In every High Court, there is a Chief Justice and many other judges whose number is defined by the President of India as there is no specification in Constitution.
  • The Chief Justice of a High Court is appointed by the President with the consultation of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court and the Governor of the State.
  • The other judges are appointed by the will of President, Governor and the Chief Justice of High Court.
  • A judge may leave his office by resigning. He will send his letter of resignation to the President.
  • A judge of High Court may be removed by the President if the Parliament passes a motion against him by an absolute majority and 2/3rd majority of the members present and voting, both the Houses sitting separately.

 

 

 

Death sentence awarded by a lower court has to be confirmed by the High Court. Right OR Wrong?

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Answer:

Enrich Your Learning:

About Jurisdiction of High Court:

  • The jurisdiction of the High Court extends up to the territorial limits of the concerned State/States or Union Territories.
  • The High Court has original and appellate jurisdictions.
  • Under the original jurisdiction certain types of cases may be brought directly before a High Court.
  • The High Court exercises original jurisdiction for the enforcement of Fundamental Rights and other legal rights. In this respect High Court has the power to issue writs.
  • These writs go a long way in protecting the rights of the individual against encroachment by the legislature, the executive or any other authority.
  • The High Court may also hear election petitions under its original jurisdiction challenging election of a member of State Legislature.
  • Under appellate jurisdiction, High Courts hear appeals against the judgments of the subordinate courts at the district level.
  • In civil cases, an appeal may be filed before the High Court against the judgment of a District Judge. In criminal matters, appeal may be made before a High Court against the judgment of a Sessions Court, where the sentence of imprisonment exceeds seven years.
  • Death sentence awarded by a lower court has to be confirmed by the High Court.
  • The High Court exercises powers of control and superintendence over all subordinate courts falling within its jurisdiction.
  • The High Court is a Court of Record. Hence, all the subordinate courts follow the judgments of the High Court. High Courts may also punish for contempt or disrespect of the Court.

 

 

 

The writ of Mandamus can also be issued against which person/body?

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Answer:

  • The writ of Mandamus can be issued against any public body, a corporation, an inferior court, a tribunal or government for the same purpose.

Enrich Your Learning:

The writ of mandamus cannot be issued

  • Against a private individual or body
  • To enforce departmental instruction that does not possess statutory force
  • When the duty is discretionary and not mandatory
  • To enforce a contractual obligation
  • Against the President of India or the Governors
  • Against the Chief Justice of a high court acting in judicial capacity

 

 

 

Section 20A of the Representation of the People Act is associated with which issue?

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Answer:

  • Section 20A of the Representation of the People Act lays down the special provisions for citizens of India residing outside India.

Enrich Your Learning:

Section 20A lays down the special provisions for citizens of India residing outside India. They are as follows:

Notwithstanding anything contained in this Act, every citizen of India —

  • whose name is not included in the electoral roll;
  • who has not acquired the citizenship of any other country; and
  • who is absenting from his place of ordinary residence in India owing to his employment, education or otherwise outside India (whether temporarily or not), shall be entitled to have his name registered in the electoral roll in the constituency in which his place of residence in India as mentioned in his passport is located.

 

 

 

Appointments to the District Courts are made by the Supreme Court at recommendation of whom?

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Answer:

  • Appointments to the District Courts are made by the Governor in consultation with the High Court.

Enrich Your Learning:

Appointment of District Judges:

  • Appointments to the District Courts are made by the Governor in consultation with the High Court.
  • A person to be eligible for appointment should be either an advocate or a pleader of seven years standing, or an officer in the service of the Union or the State.
  • Appointment of persons other than the District Judges to the judicial service of a State is made by the Governor in accordance with the rules made by him in that behalf after consultation with the High Court and the State Public Service Commission.
  • The High Court exercises control over the District Courts and the courts subordinate to them, in matters as posting, promotions and granting of leave to all persons belonging to the State judicial service.

 

 

 

Indian Judiciary does not dependent for salaries on either the executive or legislature. Right OR Wrong?

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Answer:

Enrich Your Learning:

About Independence of Court:

  • The judges have a fixed tenure.
  • They hold office till reaching the age of retirement.
  • Only in exceptional cases, judges may be removed. But otherwise, they have security of tenure.
  • Security of tenure ensures that judges could function without fear or favour.
  • The Constitution prescribes a very difficult procedure for removal of judges.
  • The Constitution makers believed that a difficult procedure of removal would provide security of office to the members of judiciary.
  • The judiciary is not financially dependent on either the executive or legislature.
  • The Constitution provides that the salaries and allowances of the judges are not subjected to the approval of the legislature.
  • The actions and decisions of the judges are immune from personal criticisms.
  • The judiciary has the power to penalise those who are found guilty of contempt of court.
  • This authority of the court is seen as an effective protection to the judges from unfair criticism.
  • Parliament cannot discuss the conduct of the judges except when the proceeding to remove a judge is being carried out.
  • This gives the judiciary independence to adjudicate without fear of being criticised.

 

 

 

In India, Judicial Review is exclusively vested in the Supreme Court. Right OR Wrong?

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Answer:

Right Statement:

In India, Judicial Review is exercised by both High Courts and Supreme Court.

Enrich Your Learning:

The Constitution of India is the supreme law of the land and the Supreme Court is its interpreter and guardian.

  • It does not allow the executive or the Parliament to violate any provision of the Constitution.
  • It can also review any action of the Government, which allegedly violates any provision of the Fundamental Rights.
  • Judicial review in India is based on the ‘procedure established by the law ‘in Article 21. Under this the courts can review a Parliamentary law only if it was not enacted following the right procedure.
  • This power of the Supreme Court is called Judicial Review
  • It is a process through which judiciary examines whether a law enacted by a legislature or an action of the executive is in accordance with the Constitution or not.
  • The power of the judicial review was first acquired by the Supreme Court of the United States.
  • Now it is freely exercised by the Supreme Court of India and in many other countries. Our High Courts also exercise this power.
  • Judicial Review does not mean that every law passed by the legislature is taken up by the Supreme Court for review.
  • It only means that the Court will review the law as and when it gets an opportunity. This is possible in two ways.
  • First, the Court can review the law if its validity is challenged.
  • The Supreme Court or High Court may get an opportunity to review a law in another situation also.
  • If a person or institution feels that his/her rights are violated, or a certain benefit due to him under a law is being denied, the Court while examining such a petition may come to the conclusion that the law, under which relief is sought, is itself unconstitutional. Therefore, relief may not be granted.

 

 

 

Article 14 is entirely derived from the British Constitution. Right OR Wrong?

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Answer:

Right Statement:

  • The source of article 14 lies in American and British constitutions.

Enrich Your Learning:

About Article 14:

  • The State shall not deny any person ‘equality before law’ and ‘equal protection of laws’ within the territory of India.
  • The source of article 14 lies in American and British constitutions.
  • ‘Equality before law’ is borrowed from the British Constitution and negative in connotation implying the absence of any special privilege in favour of the individual whereas ‘Equal protection of laws’ is borrowed from US, but positive in connotation.
  • It means that all people have to get equal treatment in similar circumstances. The element of reasonableness is an important consequence to apply this right.
  • It is also available even to foreigners and aliens alike.
  • To spell out, the principle of equality in greater detail, Article 15 directs that the State shall not discriminate against a citizen on grounds of religion, race, caste, sex or place of birth or any of them.
  • It prohibits discrimination but permits state to make special provisions.
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